PRINT DIGITAL: Local newspaper’s past and future and why comms should be bothered

I saw the past and I saw the future of newspapers within a few days of each other.

The past? A glorious documentary on the Birmingham Evening Mail from 1993. Unbroadcast it emerged on YouTube from an old VHS copy.

The future? A blog post from the newspaper’s successor as editor Marc Reeves. In it he explained the push towards a digital-first approach that will see a re-brand as Birmingham Live.

What the past looked like

The newspapers of the past were glorious places. They were staffed by journalists whose craft had not changed for a hundred years. Build contacts. Talk to them. Build stories on what they told you. It’s as simple as it is hard. I worked in the largest district office in the largest regional newspaper in the UK. There were 12 of us and three photographers and we were a team.

The Birmingham Mail documentary captured some of that. Big stories saw a reporter go out accompanied with a photographer. The deadline was print. There were some characters.

What the future looks like

For all that I loved working on those old school newspapers when I left in 2005 they were already changing. Journalism was changing too. Where I learned how to write the new journalist wrote, took pictures, blogged, worked with FOI and posted video.

As my career in communications has evolved I’ve seen what you need to do change and evolve. There are at least 40 skills you need. You can’t do all of them but your team should.

Just this month the Oldham Chronicle closed its doors for the last time a victim of the change from print to digital. In its heyday 40,000 copies were sold. When the last rites were read there was little over 6,000.

It is tempting to be sad and declare local journalism dead. From the evidence of those who are doing it, that’s not the case. The old newsrooms are dead. I get the pain of journos who have lived through that. But I also get the excitement of new thinking too.
Birmingham Mail editor Marc Reeves in his Medium post ‘I Do Run A Newspaper’ shows the path he is taking. There will be a print team. There will be a digital team. There wikll be a bit of cross-over. The digital team will focus on communities. Part geographical and part community of interest.

Two lines in particular stand out:

In an analytics-driven newsroom, you go for the stories that engage more people more meaningfully — and tell them using audio, video, data and graphics, if that’s what’s needed.

In the smartphone age, only 5 per cent of the average person’s attention is devoted to news on their device. Can we build a business by limiting ourselves to 5 per cent of people’s attention, or can we own more of the remaining 95 per cent?

Why comms people should be bothered

When I started the comms team was geared around the needs of the newspaper. Some newspapers live on. But if there is no newspaper as we know it, or it has changed from the 1993 model what should the comms team look like?

It should have more than one skill for a start.

It should have the 40 skills I blogged about and more. It should be able to articulate the organisation’s own stories in content that can be shared.

It should see the changes in the tectonic plates.

It should plan a new path while articulating why these changes are being made to those inside the organisation.

It should also be able to listen, be answerable and create content for the new newspapers of the future as well as the bloggers.

Above all it shouldn’t fear change.


2 Comments on “PRINT DIGITAL: Local newspaper’s past and future and why comms should be bothered”

  1. Thanks Dan. It’ll be interesting to see how the kind of changes we’re embarking on in Brum will impact on comms. One aspect where the two sides overlap will be in how we define our patches, or beats. I think we’ll be putting behind us the old terminology and structures defined along the lines of ‘Education’, ‘Health’, ‘Transport’ etc. Instead, we’ll define what we do and how we’re organised using terms related to how people actually live their lives, and how they engage online: ‘family’, ‘fun’ etc. For example, council stories should never be about the institution, but rather the experience of people using their services. BTW, there’s a link to my post here https://medium.com/@marcreeves1965/i-do-run-a-newspaper-b9121a0e57be


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