OPEN PANINI: In Praise of the Got, Got Need Machine

Four years ago during the World Cup I blogged about how Panini stickers were the original social media.

I’m fascinated at how a Greek defender and a spare Polish midfielder can bring people together and forge connections.

I’m also fascinated at how as an extra layer on top of these human interactions the social web is being put to use.

There’s the inspired Twitter hashtag #gotgotneed that Panini deployed.

There’s stories like Russ Cockburn only spending £90 to collect the entire Panini sticker book because he used the closed Facebook group  Panini World Cup Swapsies I belong to with 117 members that I belong to that just grows and grows.

Fullscreen capture 12062014 111643-001

The majestic epic brilliance of the got, got need machine…

But what’s also caught my eye is a web application knocked up by brewcamp colleague Simon Whitehouse from Birmingham. Called the Got, Got Need Machine it’s a way of working out based on maths how many stickers you need to buy in order to complete your collection based on probability and a whole load of sums. You can see it here: 

Fullscreen capture 12062014 111951

Me and Simon have talked before about open data and data. I’m a bit of a sceptic. When I see it demonstrated it’s brilliant. But I think the open data community are too inward looking and too keen to impress each other rather than impress real people whose lives they could make a big difference to. Open data has not delivered on a promise to change the world. That’s not to say it won’t. But it’s reaching out as this does that will help it.

So, if data crunched to produce something can work for Panini stickers what could it do crunched for other comms projects?

That’s an idea to swap.

But first go and check out Simon’s website.

 


SOCIAL PROPOSAL: Proposals to Improve Health and Wellbeing Board Social Media… what do you think?

179279964_8e0675c135_oThere’s a new network of key bodies across England that work to improve the health and wellbeing of their local residents and reduce health inequalities.

Known as ‘health and wellbeing boards’, they bring together the local council, clinical commissioning group, Healthwatch and other key local players in a genuine partnership and they do a really important job.

By their own admission they are not always great at using social media and, while there are some good examples, we think some light-touch guidance would encourage people to explore the opportunities of increased or improved digital engagement.

We’re very pleased to say that we have been chosen by the Local Government Association to help them draw up some proposals for this guidance and we’d like to ask what you think of it so we can polish and shape it.

We think better social media can lead to better engagement, better transparency, better communication, better curation and better listening.

Our broad thoughts in six points:

  • Rather than have a one-size fits all set of guidelines we think they should be phased from the entry-level one star right up to the top-of-the-class five star.
  • We think there should be some thought given to the name of whichever social profile is used. It may be that the name ‘health and wellbeing board’ is off-putting to some people.
  • We think there is enough guidance out there for professionals and we’d like to signpost people towards that. Doctors, for example, have the BMA social media guidelines. Elected members have some of their own too. We don’t want to replace these but we do make some suggestions for how social media can be used by the health and wellbeing board as a whole.
  • It’s not just Twitter. There is a range of different platforms. So when slides are shown, for example, they can be posted to a platform like slideshare so people can follow at home.
  • Yes, livestreaming meetings on the internet is a good idea and we’d not only encourage that but we’d ask that space be given for the public to ask questions via a social channel too.
  • We think engagement between meetings is key too. Not just during.

We think there should be some broad principles too:

The Five Be’s of an effective social Health and Wellbeing Board

Be engaging: it should interact wherever possible with users and reflect the debate.

Be timely: it should post information at a time that is most convenient to the audience.

Be jargon-free: it should use language that works on the platform of choice. It should not use jargon and language that people outside the health and wellbeing board would struggle to understand. It should be informal wherever possible.

Be connected: it should look to share content from partners and from across the public or third sector where is relevant. It could work with the partners who make-up the board to collectively focus on an issue to amplify a message and a debate.

Be informative: it should look to inform and to educate.

The five levels of social media

We’d love people to be on the fifth level but we have to be realistic. These proposed five levels give a low barrier to entry on level one and encourage councils to progress.

Level  Requirement
Level One -       Post meeting date and time on one social platform-       Jargon free
Level Two -       Post meeting date and time on one social platform-       Jargon free

-       Cover meeting discussion on one social platform and curate content.

-       Publish slides of presentations given at the meeting and post to a health and wellbeing board page or microsite.

Level Three -       Post meeting date and time on one social platform-       Jargon free

-       Cover meeting discussion on one social platform and curate content.

-       Publish slides of presentations given at the meeting and post to a health and wellbeing board page or microsite.

-       Livestream or allow residents to livestream and curate content.

-       Enable questions to be asked of the meeting from social media

Level Four -       Post meeting date and time on one social platform-       Jargon free

-       Cover meeting discussion on one social platform and curate content.

-       Publish slides of presentations given at the meeting and post to a health and wellbeing board page or microsite.

-       Livestream or allow residents to livestream and curate content.

-       Enable questions to be asked of the meeting from social media

-       Digital engagement through social media between meetings that is fed back into the entire decision making process

Level Five -       Post meeting date and time on one social platform-       Jargon free

-       Cover meeting discussion on one social platform and curate content.

-       Publish slides of presentations given at the meeting and post to a health and wellbeing board page or microsite.

-       Livestream or allow residents to livestream and curate content.

-       Enable questions to be asked of the meeting from social media

-       Digital engagement through social media between meetings that is fed back into the entire decision making process

-       Searchable agendas that used metadata

-       An interactive website that the public can comment on.

-       Members enabled to use one or more platform during and between meetings

 

So what do you think? Do you agree? Disagree? We’d like you to have your say on this.

Please complete our online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/LGAforHWB.

Visit the LGA website for more information and a Word doc version of the survey.

The consultation closes on 2 July.

 Creative commons credits

Jumping http://www.flickr.com/photos/40645538@N00/179279964/


WEB NUMBERS: Your Very Own Crowdsourced List of ‘Wow’ Internet Stats

72778694_e138908855_oSometimes the internet is a wonderful thing in the numbers it creates but most of all the connections it makes.

I posted to Twitter a query that I wondered if people could help come up with some stats to show how amazing the internet is in numbers. And Twitter delivered just as it so often does. Rather than just favourite the responses and move on I thought I’d blog the results.

Six people retweeted the request and four people came back with some results. Here are those results.

It breaks down into the picture today and predictions of what is likely to happen.  There’s a health warning to this. You’ll quickly lose track of the numbers and your jaw will hit the floor.

The internet: what is here today

The internet in realtime is a brilliant link that shows how quickly is generated. The figures whizz by across a range of platforms like twitter, Instagram, google, foursquare and others and start from zero from the second you log on.

Alternatively, internet live stats looks at the big picture. The really big picture of how many internet users there are in the world (2.9 billion and counting when I looked) and the number of websites (almost 1 billion when I looked.)

There is also a rather cracking digital marketing website that seeks to pull together a blizzard of stats from across the internet over who is using what and where.

And also the excellent Shift Happens update for 2014 with a blizzard of stats in a YouTube film.

And also the wearesocial global social media survey for 2014.

And the

(thanks @dansutch @sarahlay @brownhillsbob and @annieheath @madlinsugdn @paulwebster)

The internet: what is yet to come

Here is a link to infographics about the internet of things. This is part of the internet that has yet to arrive in a widespread way. This is the device that has its own IP address and can communicate over the internet. This

It talks about the £30 billion industry around wearable tech and the prediction that by 2020 there will be 50 billion things connected by the internet.

It also talks about how the internet doubles in size every two years and is expected to rise from 4.4 trillion gigabytes to 44 trillion gigabytes a year. An 8 gigabyte kindle is supposed to store 3,000 books and my brain capsizes at what a gigabyte may store.

There’s also a rather good internet trends deck which is worth carefully studying.

(thanks @straightbatpr and @nicdaviesuley and @6loss)

Pic credit:

Numbers http://www.flickr.com/photos/51035555243@N01/72778694/


FROMAGE SHOP: Why Being Human Beats Being French Cheese

Have you heard the one about the chatty English book shop and the unspontaneous French cheese maker?

One has 50,000 followers on Twitter and from their smartphone give a slightly idiosyncratic view from Waterstones in Oxford Street, London. It shows how trusting staff can work.

The other President Cheese has 153 followers and employs a company with a team of 13 in a Star Trek-style ‘war room’ that takes up to 43 days to draw-up a tweet in a highly planned campaign.

But for me nothing I’ve come across better illustrates how being human on social media runs rings around the scripted, over agonised and contrived.

For the book shop you can substitute it for the Lakeland Shepherd, the police constable or the Scottish island librarian. All people for whom with engaging conversation online builds bridges.

Here are a few quick examples:

This right here is the culture clash that I come across talking to the traditional comms person who doesn’t want to let go of the reigns, agonises over and wants to measure everything.

I’m not against scheduling some content. Honest, I’m not. The 3am tweet from the NHS to reach the person suffering from stress and unable to sleep is inspired.

I’m not even against measuring things. What people did as the result of some digital content is far more interesting than the size of the audience.

I quite like the 80-20 split that many good social profiles have. The 80 per cent conversation and the 20 per cent things you’d like people to know. The pics of bees posted along with a rescued bat in Walsall Council countryside ranger Morgan Bowers’ work to build an audience. The occasional update about basket weaving gets people along to her sessions.

But the professionalising of conversation just leaves me feeling uneasy and reminds me of a conversation I had with Birmingham blogger Pete Ashton who did much to build the social landscape in the West Midlands. He said he deliberately moved away from the ‘professional social media’ because he hated what it was becoming in the wrong hands.

If you need to outsource your conversation and take 45 days over 140 characters then, Holy Cheddar, you are struggling.

Acknowledgements: Simon Whitehouse who flagged up the original 45-day case study and Chris Ellis for spotting that the cheese account has 153 followers.


PODCAST: My Podcasting Guest Debut With Dave Briggs

4693366430_48c3e2fdf0_bA good podcast educates, informs and leaves you wanting more and I don’t listen to anywhere near enough of them.

I’m delighted to say that the excellent Dave Briggs has started a podcast where he talks to someone about what they’ve been doing that week and talks to them about some links they may have come across.

Dave has done some fantastic work understanding how the internet and the social web can work in government and local government and he continues to do great work most recently looking at how digital skills can benefit the workplace through his worksmart project.

I’m even more delighted to say that Dave asked me to be a guest on the first podcast he recorded and we spent an engaging 45-minutes talking.

You can hear the podcast here:

http://traffic.libsyn.com/davebriggs/ep1-danslee.mp3

We spoke about quite a few things including failure and the benefits of failure, the content14 event in Cardiff, Pete Ashton, infographics, Helen Reynolds and ChannelShiftCamp North.

The full links and show notes can be found on Dave’s blog here.

It promises to be an interesting series with more guests and I’d urge you to pay attention.

Creative commons credit

Dave Briggs https://flic.kr/p/89JJjS


PROTEST PR: How Comms Should Answer Cuts Questions

8544982977_36a47ac99a_oYou’re a public sector PR person and you’ve got to answer a question from the media about cuts, what do you do?

Forecasts say there will be 40 per cent job losses in some areas of the public sector with £3.3 billion being taken from the voluntary sector over a five year period and £20 billion coming from local government and £15 billion of efficiency savings due in the NHS.

So, what stories are being shaped? If you work in the sector it’s probably long overdue time to think about it.

A)      Apply a positive gloss and insist that yes, efficiencies will be made but frontline services will not be cut.
B)      Tell people that they had their chance to have their say in the budget consultation and they blew it.
C)       Tell people that this is what cuts look like.

All too often people in the public sector have been going for a) to try and minimise panic and upset on the population. But with £20 billion worth of cuts coming down the tracks in local government we need to be above all honest. So, let’s just take a closer look at that, shall we?

What insisting that efficiencies will be made and frontline services will not be cut means

You’ve been cutting millions of pounds from budgets for years. But the frontline hasn’t been affected? Efficiencies? Clearly, you were wasting that money all along so why on earth should I trust you now?

Or, you’re trying to be a bit clever and you know that the frontline will very much be affected but the couple of hours of mobile library visit will somehow make-up for the five-day-a-week building the community used to have. People won’t buy it, or they’ll see through it. So, why should they trust you now?

What telling people that they’ve had their chance means

You’ve pinned up details of a public meeting at the church hall and you paid three times the rate for a display ad in the local paper because it’s a public notice and they’ve got you over a barrel. Twelve people turned up and the Twitter chat you ran reached a fair number but not everyone. In other words, you’ve not done a very good job of this public consultation lark. Why should they trust you now?

What telling people that this is what cuts look like looks like

In Birmingham, this is exactly what Cllr James McKay told the Evening Mail about green bin charges in the City as people were protesting against cuts. Yes, it’s messy. Yes, people won’t like it. But look yourself in the eye. This is the truth. This is going to happen more and more and public sector comms increasingly is going to be about what you don’t do rather than you do.

But at least they’ll trust you more because you are being honest.

A grown-up conversation is needed about communicating cuts and if you work in the area you need to work out which choice you make pretty quick.

Creative commons credit 

Dog protest https://www.flickr.com/photos/16230215@N08/8544982977/


FAIL FORWARD: Don’t Fear Failure – blog and slideshare

IMAG0519It’s such a damning word isn’t it, failure? It’s the bowler hatted man falling on a banana skin or the wrongly sent tweet that leaves us falling about LOL-ing.

But the truth is, failure is beautiful. From failure we learn and we can do a better job. We shouldn’t fear failure. We should leave space for failure so we can have the confidence to do bigger better things.

I was faced with a real dilemma just recently. I’d agreed to speak on the topic of failure at the commshero event in Manchester. Fantastic, I thought. A chance to have people rolling in the aisles at a parade of digital fails. Like the subbing mistake on the front page of a magazine that led you to think of how the cover star was a dog eating cannibal.

Or the British Gas #askbg hashtag.

Or maybe even struggling Aston Villa’s Twitter chat with a fringe player that went badly wrong. I could maybe even tell the story of the Walsall Council Twitter fail and what we learned. And that’s the key. What we learned. When you fail you learn.

There’s a matrix that shows the bigger the fail the bigger the learning. It’s what happened on the north face of the Eiger in the 1930s where one of the most famous mountaineering disasters in history killed the four members of the climbing party told in mountaineering epic ‘The White Spider’ by Heinrich Harrer and the excellent film ‘The Beckoning Silence.’ A fixed rope was gathered in trapping their retreat when their summit attempt turned into a retreat.

Every attempt since has seen climbers leave the rope in place. See? We learn. Don’t laugh at failure. Learn. But what was also tempting was just to look at digital fails when there is more to communications than that.

Because if you are not thinking about strategy you are failing. If you are not finding out what keeps senior people awake at night and planning your comms around that you are failing.

If you are not leaving space to experiment, learn and even fail, you are failing. That’s all a bigger crime than a tactical. blunder.

So, what are you doing about that?

Commsheroes danslee-final from Daniel Slee

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